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Three healthy ways to transform your energy levels

By Dan Cole on 7th April 2019

I don’t know about you, but I find that simply arriving at work on time, alongside staying on top of the laundry, is tough enough. When you throw in the attempt of maintaining a social life alongside a nine-to-five lifestyle, it’s little wonder that a five-yearly government survey found that Britons are working harder than at any time in the last 25-years. That’s why, here at Luxury Lifestyle Magazine, we’ve teamed up with a network of lifestyle coaches and nutritionists to bring you our top five energy-boosting tips to bring you back to your best.

Don’t overdo the carbs

Research shows that a great deal of the western world’s obesity epidemic can be attributed to the volume of carbohydrates being consumed, not fat

Contrary to prevailing NHS advice on the subject, contemporary research from dietitians have indicated that a great deal of the western world’s prevailing obesity epidemic can be attributed to the volume of carbohydrates being consumed, not fat. From an energy perspective, carbohydrates (which includes traditional staples like rice, pasta, bread and potatoes) provide the quickest short-term fix, but often leave you lacking satiation and heading to the cupboard for more snacks soon after. The present research indicates that adapting your meal-plan to the fabled Mediterranean diet can keep hunger down, and provide you with a steadier energy level through the day. Making simple changes like switching the sugary drinks out for water, cutting down on sugars and switching your processed protein shakes for GMO-free and all natural pre workout for clean energy can make a huge difference to your body’s ability to maintain energy levels. Increasing protein intake through less starchy green vegetables, as well as lean meats like chicken breast, will help you avoid the inevitable lows that come with a high-carb diet.

Get more sleep

Ensure that you allow your body to wind down before bedtime

This one seems obvious, right? Well, if it is, why do so many of us fail to heed one of our basest of instincts? Since the dawn of humanity, we have obeyed the rhythm of day and night, but in the past century, the advent of electricity and development in technologies have started to play havoc with our system.

According to 2017’s Nobel prize-winning biologists Michael Rosbash, Jeffrey Hall and Michael Young, many in the Western world are chronically sleep deprived. Their research in the field of sleep science discovered that not only does level of sleep affect one’s ability to remain alert and maintain energy levels, but it can have long-term effects on anything from the secretion of hormones to the preparation of digestive enzymes.

For many, it is a struggle to wake up in the morning, but, for some reason, one’s most ‘wired’ phase of the day can come before night-time. Research into this phenomenon, referred to as sleep hygiene, traces a great deal of the struggle to technology use. If, like many modern workers, you spend much of your day in a dimly lit office, and then spend a weekday evening in front of your television or laptop, your body is actually receiving the opposite signals to the hard-wired notion of night and day, which can often leave people experiencing a topsy-turvy body-clock. The advice? Ensure that you allow your body to wind down before bedtime, avoid the lure of bright screens and Netflix marathons in favour of something a little less bright.

Move more, not less

Exercise has pretty firm causational links with improved moods, regulation of blood sugar and helping you sleep, both easier and for longer

I know it is extremely tempting to get home and collapse after a long day at the office, but, although it feels counter-intuitive, one of the keys to unlock increase energy levels is by keeping moving. Exercise has pretty firm causational links with improved moods, regulation of blood sugar and helping you sleep, both easier and for longer.

More importantly, though, for the purposes of this topic, exercise is proven to reduce feelings of fatigue. A National Institute of Health randomised controlled trial undertaken in 2008 saw energy levels increase in 100% of participants who underwent a reasonably gentle six-week exercise regime – including those suffering undiagnosed chronic fatigue symptoms.

Of course, there are other crucial benefits to increasing your exercise levels, including weight loss and the reduction of chronic disease risk.

For maximum effect – do all three

The great thing about all three of these approaches to energy restoration is that they are achievable, to some degree, collaboratively – and doing all three will ensure you get the best results. That said, changing lifestyle can be challenging, and there’s no shame in starting slowly.

Perhaps begin by getting off the tube a stop early and walking the rest of the way, and maybe switching your morning breakfast cereal (often high in sugar and not slow-releasing), for a more natural alternative. But remember: by changing nothing, nothing changes.